Musicians need to stand for something!

Hola a todos. Musicians all over el mundo/the world need to stand for something, despite any possible consequences. Just as concert pianist Valentina Lisitsa did when she expressed her pro-Russian feelings. After making her views known, her scheduled performance with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra was cancelled for her 2015 soloist engagement to perform the Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 2 in c minor. You can hear her play the Rachmaninov with another orchestra in the video below. I have no details on this performance (which orchestra?) as they are not listed in the video description. One of my commenters (Conservatory Student) refreshed my memory about this story which I too had read about sometime back having to do with the cancellation of Valentina’s performance with the TSO. Valentina was taking a stand for her principles and convictions. Also in 2015, there was another musician, pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim announced his plans to take his Berlin orchestra, The Staatskapelle Berlin, to Iran despite protests from the #2 Terrorist State on the planet, Israel. One might be asking: “Who’s the #1 Terrorist State on the planet?” That would be Los Estados Unidos/The United States, the World’s #1 Arrogant Bully and World Police Operative. The US is constantly dictating to other nations what they will and will not do usually from a place of blatant hypocrisy. That’s because the US often lectures/makes demands of other countries not to do what the US has been doing for decades. One example of that: The US demands: “You must get rid of your nuclear weapons,” while the US has the largest stockpile of nuclear weapons in el mundo and with no intention of getting rid of them and the US is the only nation to have ever used nuclear weapons on a civilian population while pretending to be a christian nation. The US of Hypocrisy is such a barbaric nation! A third example of a musician standing for his principles and convictions was when Pianist Evgeny Kissin protested against BBC’s anti-Israel bias.

These days, most musicians don’t seem to possess the integrity, principles and convictions of the three musicians I’ve listed. Most musicians are the “go with the flow” type of sheeple. They follow the herd and therefore are part of problem. They are wet-doilies. They are the spineless musicians who stand for nothing like what one finds at Washington National Cathedral. Musicians such as organists Benjamin Straley, George Fergus, the Director of Music/Choirmaster Michael McCarthy and the Men of the Cathedral Choir along with the parents of the Boy and Girl Choristers, all of whom could have refused to perform for the vile and repugnant Führer Trump, (the parents could have refused to allow their child to perform for that basura). But the musicians of Washington National Cathedral stood for nothing as I wrote about in this article.

World history shows that revolutions happen, in part, because of musicians and music. Here en los Estados Unidos/in the US, the 1960s revolution — the most recent revolution here — was in major part because of artists and musicians of all genres, from the classical music tradition to the rock field. Related: The Sixties and Protest Music.

The world would not have pacifist Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem if he had held to the ludicrous view that politics must be completely separate/divorced from music. I’m well aware that the Classical Music Snots (whom I can’t stand) like to divorce music and politics. I know of one art’s writer in Turkey where bombs could be falling outside her window but she wouldn’t dare bring herself to write about it because she’s of this backward thinking that politics and art have no connection. Utterly moronic. Apparently la mujer/the woman never learned that much of music and art is indeed inspired by and connected to politics and what was going on in the lives of composers when they wrote their music and the artists who performed them.

During the Vietnam War Era, we had radical Leftist — and I’m using that language in a very positive sense — composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein. He wasn’t shy about standing for his convictions. But unfortunately, the musicians at Washington National Cathedral have chosen not to emulate Queer boys Leonard Bernstein or Benjamin Britten.

In the District of Columbia where I used to live, Richard Nixon was inaugurated as US president and there was an inauguration concert in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. There’s a story connected with that:

The Anti-War University of Maryland Chorus

The following is from David Taylor, assistant conductor of the University of Maryland Chorus at that time:

“Although my day job is now lawyering for the CFTC, in those days I was a graduate student in conducting at the University of Maryland and assistant conductor of the University of Maryland Chorus. Your post brought to my mind an experience I had involving president Nixon, Leonard Bernstein, and the Nixon inauguration in 1973, that I thought you might find of interest. In 1973 and throughout most of the 1970s, the University of Maryland Chorus performed several times each year with the National Symphony under its great music director Antal Doráti. In January of that year, the Chorus sang four performances with the NSO of Beethoven’s great Missa Solemnis (an amazing musical experience I will never forget). Given the times, those performances intersected with both president Nixon, the Vietnam War, and Leonard Bernstein. As luck would have it, our Beethoven performances were slated for the week of the inauguration. It had been a tradition for decades that during the week of each Presidential inauguration the NSO played (outside its normal subscription season) what was labeled the Inaugural Concert, as part of the festivities of inauguration week. The performance was usually attended by the president-elect, and after the building of the Kennedy Center it always took place there. Normally, this would have had nothing to do with the Beethoven concerts. However, it turned out that president Nixon had been a life-long fan of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and for what was going to be his final inauguration he expressed a wish to have the Philadelphia play the Inaugural Concert, which they did. The NSO leadership was very gracious about this change, and responded by dedicating the week’s regular NSO subscription concerts to the inauguration of the president. Of course, the anti-war movement, further fueled by the developing Watergate affair, wanted to protest the Nixon inauguration. One musical consequence of this, as you may remember, was the hasty arranging of a sort of “Anti-Inaugural Concert” consisting of a performance of Franz Joseph Haydn’s Mass in Time of War at the National Cathedral by a large chorus (I believe it was either the Cathedral Choral Society, the Choral Arts Society of Washington, or parts of both) and a pick-up orchestra, conducted by none other than that famous musical leftist, Leonard Bernstein. I was not present, since we were singing Beethoven at Kennedy Center, but was told by people who did attend that the Bernstein performance drew a huge attendance, including 2000+ inside the Cathedral and thousands more listening on loudspeakers outside. There were also nearly consequences for our Beethoven performances. A significant number of the approximately 140 members of the University of Maryland Chorus shared the sentiments of the anti-war, anti-Nixon protesters and were upset that the NSO had dedicated the Beethoven concerts to the president’s inauguration. Quite a few of them initially refused to go onstage to sing something dedicated to president Nixon. Paul Traver, the conductor of the UMD Chorus (and my major teacher) and I had to do a considerable amount of fast talking to convince them that they owed it to the Chorus, to Maestro Doráti, and to Beethoven to sing as scheduled. In the end that view prevailed, and the Missa Solemnis—one of humanity’s greatest choral treasures, and a work that dwarfs Bernstein’s Mass into utter insignificance—went forward magnificently and without incident. But it was a close-run thing.”—David Taylor, University of Maryland Chorus

I have always had the highest regard for the late Dr Traver as a choral director and founder and director of the University of Maryland Chorus. He achieved superb results with his Maryland Chorus just like Margaret Hillis (Chicago Symphony Orchestra Chorus) and Robert Shaw (Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus) achieved with their highly-regarded Orchestra Choruses. And from what I know about Richard Nixon, he was no fascist and no hate-filled arrogant bully like Donald Trump turning the presidency into a dictatorship ruling by executive orders essentially dissolving congress. But regardless, in this situation with Nixon, Dr Traver was wrong in my opinion and he refused to take a stand unfortunately and I strongly disagree with his decision. The University of Maryland Chorus should have refused to go on stage to perform for and in the presence of Richard Nixon. They should have boycotted this event. Let’s tell it like it is: This concert was about Nixon. It was not about The Maryland Chorus or Beethoven or Doráti as the Chorus was led to believe. The concert would have been cancelled because the Philadelphia Orchestra could not perform Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis without The Maryland Chorus. And with the audience seated in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, there would have been no time to find another Orchestra Chorus in the District prepared to perform the monumental Missa Solemnis. Some of the audience would have been pissed — but they would get over it! — with the UMD Chorus for standing for their anti-war convictions, while others would have applauded them for standing for what they believed. I knew nothing about this incident when I sang with them. I learned about this while writing my tribute article to them.

A brief aside: Years later, while I was a chorister in Norman Scribner’s Choral Arts Society of Washington, I heard the University of Maryland Chorus perform the Missa Solemnis with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam with Claudio Abbado conducting in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Their performance was glorious. They were superb. Their performance reminded me of the performance by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Chorus under Margaret Hillis. The following day on the local classical music station WGMS, they interviewed the soprano soloist for the performance, Sheila Armstrong. She said in the interview, “this is one of the finest Choruses I’ve ever heard.”

I have considered this: Had the UMD Chorus refused to perform for this concert with the Philadelphia Orchestra in the presence of and for Nixon, would that have been the end of future engagement invitations with the National Symphony Orchestra and guest international orchestras? I doubt it, because they were Doráti’s favourite Chorus and he invited them to perform with the NSO as often as possible. From what I know about him, he too was an anti-war person and stood for peace. Although he didn’t initiate or suggest a boycott of these performances as conductor, he may have supported them in their decision. We’ll never know. It’s much easier for an individual to stand for what s/he believes than a (large) group of people, as in the case of The Maryland Chorus, where some choristers wanted to perform for Nixon and others didn’t. What does one do in that case? Well, the decision to perform or not is decided by the Chorus Director. If only the choristers who wanted to perform went on stage, it would have been a much smaller Chorus — perhaps more the size of a Chamber Chorus — and in that case the Philadelphia Orchestra would have been too large and needed to have been reduced in size so as not to overpower the Chorus. And there may have been problems with downsizing the Orchestra, such as union issues with the orchestra. I have heard a performance with a smaller Orchestra and Chorus such as in this historically-informed superb performance from Europe: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis in D major, Op.123 | Philippe Herreweghe conducting: La Chapelle Royale & Collegium Vocale Gent (combined Choruses, from Belgium) accompanied by Orchestre des Champs-Élysées (Paris).

It disgusted me all during the Obama years to read about musician after musician and other corporate media television talking heads going to the Kennedy Center for the annual “Kennedy Center Honours” event with the Obamas in attendance as well as to la casa blanca/the white house to rub shoulders with war criminal Mr Nobel Peace Prize Obama who had killed thousands of innocent people — including wedding parties — with his many wars without shedding a tear. But that along with Obama’s expansion of most of the illegitimate Bush regime’s despicable agenda didn’t matter to these musicians, most of whom were probably Democratic partisan. Obama had no trouble turning on fake tears for corporate media network cameras after some gun-violence tragedy in the US. Yet I never saw him tear up over his own violence through his barbaric wars killing thousands of innocent men, women, pregnant women and children. He pretended to be pro-GLBTQ while killing innocent GLBTQs around the world through his many wars — for the thick people: gay people/GLBTQs live all over the world — which is something the shallow GLBTQ Obamabots never considered. He’s a terribly hypocritical human being. But one devoutly partisan Democratic Party disciple after the other swarmed to the white house to perform for him and/or to speak in his presence.

Other than some Latino/Hispano/mexicano musicians and actors who stand up against hate directed at inmigrantes indocumentados/undocumented immigrants/migrant workers, it seems that most musicians and actors don’t stand for anything these days. And when they do, it’s too often based on partisan nonsense, rather than being objective and what is the right thing to do. For example, if one is being objective: war is wrong. As opposed to being a partisan Democrat: War is okay when a Democrat is in office, which was/is the thinking of the Obamabots. I recently asked one shallow and superficial Obamabot about his Obama’s 8 wars and his response to me was, “Who cares!” Yet these hypocritical basura protested illegitimate George W Bush (as I did) over the same reprehensible policies.

It disgusts me whenever I see musicians of all genres and actors performing before these scum of the Earth trash politicians just because they’re on television and considered a celebrity in our shallow pop culture. I suspect many of these musicians and actors would come up with the lame excuse, “I like to rise above politics.” Translation: And stand for nothing. Just be this empty vessel as if one has been lobotomised. “I like to rise above politics” is nothing but an easy-out for shallow people where one doesn’t have to stand for anything. Politics greatly effect our lives, so this BS about, “I like to rise above politics” is just a pathetic excuse for weak people who don’t have any convictions or principles, and I can’t stand people like that. El mundo/The world needs a lot more people like pianist Valentina Lisitsa and conductor Daniel Barenboim and others that I’ve mentioned and linked to in this article. Chau.—el barrio rosa

Related:

Neil Young asks Obama to stop ‘violent aggression’ at Dakota pipeline protest

When Musicians Boycott to Protest Politics

122 musicians sign letter to president Obama about Standing Rock protests

Protest Music for the Trump Era

6 comments on “Musicians need to stand for something!

  1. D8

    Fascinating reading about the history from around the Nixon era, I’d never heard about that. Like i’ve said before, always enjoy your behind the scenes accounts of things musically. Gives a more human feel to it.

    The musicians at Washington National Cathedral should be ashamed of themselves for performing for Trump.

    For what it’s worth – I read that Malia Obama joined the Dakota Access Pipeline Project protest. Funny she never did that while her father was president.

  2. strangetimes

    reading here about the 1970s — despite the problems at that time, it seems like a much better time than where we are today. like pb says, we’re rushing back to the 1940s so fast now, esp under führer trump. agree with your comments about musicians and actors that they should be taking a stand.

    strangetimes.

    1. Former San Franciscan

      If I had a choice, I think I’d go back to the 70s rather than the way things are today, and I’m not the type of person to live in the past. Today is just, well, …..I think that’s already been covered. :-(

      Excellent article, pink barrio. Appreciate the historical perspective. What is it about church musicians who are without scruples? (I’m thinking of Washington National Cathedral and what they did – really disgusting).

  3. Conservatory Student

    Very kind of you to mention my comment in your article. Very interesting reading. Wish I could have heard the UMD Chorus. Sounds like they were fabulous and conductors knew that with all their invitations with major symphony orchestras. Performing with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam… an experience they’ll never forget. Not that I would ever be invited to perform for Trump, but I’d refuse, and I know you would!!

  4. Wes in Arlington - GLBTQ

    So true. I was so sorry to read last week about the musicians at Washington National Cathedral performing for Trump. How could they do that???? After that I have no interest in going up there now for a service or in watching them online. Feel the same way you do.

    Thanks for mentioning the UMD Chorus (my alma mater) and for keeping their legacy alive in our memory. THey were greatly respected around here, and elsewhere. I often heard students on campus say, “the University Chorus is performing at Kennedy Center tonight with the NSO.” It made us all feel proud of them whether we were in the School of Music or not. (I’m not a musician). I have a friend in NY who went to hear them at Carnegie Hall. He still talks about that every now and then.

    I agree w/ you that musicians need to stand for something, although not holding my breath. Take care.

    1. Ellen in Maryland

      Hello Wes,, thanks for that. Really a shame that the UMD Chorus concerts were never recorded. So many great performances lost. My friend and I (we’re in our local church choir) went to them all and still reminisce about them to this day. We didn’t know anything about the behind the scene politics involved with the Beethoven concert mentioned in the article. We would have supported them not going on stage.

      What happened at the cathedral in the District where they played and sang for Trump was a travesty.
      Good to see some musicians standing up but a whole lot more need to grow a spine and do so.

Fin. The End.